Financial Literacy

Too many college students don’t have a good sense of budgeting or managing personal finance. Students loans, credit cards, and personal loans (like car loans) can add up to significant debt levels by the time graduation finally appears. The links on this page provide information about how to manage spending, minimize debt, and make good financial choices. These websites are not sponsored by the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, and you should carefully evaluate any financial advice that you receive. Do your homework, and research any financial decisions first.

Financial Aid Budget Instructions

Creating a simple monthly budget – matched with diligent expense tracking – will show you exactly where your money is going. This interactive worksheet can be used as a tool to help you create your personal budget.

Repaying Student Loans

This handout provides basic information about how to manage the repayment process.

Financial Awareness Counseling

This online tool from the US Department of education provides information to help you understand your financial aid and assist you in managing your finances.

Feed the Pig

Sponsored by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and the Ad Council, Feed the Pig is designed to help young adults take control of their personal finances.

College Foundation of North Carolina

CFNC has a variety of calculators to assist with budgeting, deciding how much to borrow, estimating loan repayments, balancing your checkbook and more.

Triangle Family Services

TFS is a non-profit organization in the Raleigh area that assists with financial security, family safety, and mental health.

NC Division of Social Services

The North Carolina Division of Social Services provides a range of services and assistance to families in need.

StopBuyingCrap.com

A personal finance blog by a college student who got into debt and worked his way out. This fun, easy-to-read blog gives lots of money saving strategies and tips.

20somethingfinance.com

This blog is written by a young adult with information about many areas of personal finance.